Most actively traded companies on the TSX

Most actively traded companies on the TSX
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Some of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:

Toronto Stock Exchange (15,303.83, up 92.61 points).

Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Health care. Down 17 cents, or 1.95 per cent, to $8.53 on 24.4 million shares.

MEG Energy Corp. (TSX:MEG). Energy. Down 15 cents, or 2.73 per cent, to $5.35 on 12.4 million shares.

Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Industrials. Up one cent, or 0.48 per cent, to $2.10 on 11.4 million shares.

Encana Corp. (TSX:ECA). Energy. Up 14 cents, or 1.52 per cent, to $9.34 on 8.8 million shares.

Baytex Energy Corp. (TSX:BTE). Energy. Down six cents, or 2.3 per cent, to $2.55 on 6.9 million shares.

Hexo Corp. (TSX:HEXO). Health care. Up 51 cents, or 7.96 per cent, to $6.92 on 6.3 million shares.

Companies reporting:

MEG Energy Corp. Shares in oilsands producer MEG Energy continued to slide Friday after a credit rating agency said rival Husky Energy Inc.’s failure to consummate a hostile takeover bid was actually “credit positive” for Husky. After falling 35.6 per cent on Thursday, MEG stock lost another 2.7 per cent on Friday. Husky lost 4.3 per cent after gaining 12.4 per cent Thursday, Husky’s decision to abandon its bid for MEG after more than 50 per cent of the shares were tendered by Wednesday afternoon’s deadline surprised most financial analysts who had expected it to extend more time to try to achieve the two-thirds support it needed.

WestJet Airlines Inc. (TSX:WJA). Up 43 cents or 2.3 per cent to $18.98. The Transportation Safety Board of Canada says an onboard fire that forced a WestJet plane to return to the Calgary International Airport soon after takeoff last June was caused by spare e-cigarette lithium-ion batteries that a passenger failed to declare in his checked baggage. The agency says in a report that a backpack caught fire and caused minor thermal damage to the cargo compartment’s fire-resistant liner near the bag. An investigation could not determine if the damage occurred before the batteries arrived at the airport or during baggage handling.

Canadian National Railway Co. (TSX:CNR). Up 25 cents to $109.25. The Federal Court of Appeal has upheld a ruling that found the courts have jurisdiction to determine damages CN Rail must pay after breaching its service obligations to a Prairie grain shipping company during a bumper crop five years ago. The case goes back to a complaint filed by Calgary-based Louis Dreyfus Commodities Canada Ltd. to the Canadian Transportation Agency. Dreyfus said CN failed to provide enough rail cars to some of its grain elevators in Alberta and Saskatchewan to ship the record 2013-2014 grain crop.

The Canadian Press

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